People

Emeriti

  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

Richard P. Appelbaum is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Global and International Studies. Dr. Appelbaum’s affiliation with CITS stems from his interest in the working class and new technologies. He is currently engaged in two principal research projects: a multi-disciplinary study of labor conditions in supply chain networks in the Asian-Pacific Rim and a study of high technology development in China.

Dr. Stephen R. Barley
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

Stephen Barley has written over seventy articles on the impact of new technologies on work, the organization of technical work, and organizational culture.  He edited a volume on technical work entitled Between Craft and Science: Technical Work in the United States published in 1997 by the Cornell University Press. In collaboration with Gideon Kunda of Tel Aviv University, Dr. Barley authored Gurus, Hired Guns and Warm Bodies: Itinerant Experts in the Knowledge Economy, an ethnography of contingent work among engineers and software developers published by the Princeton University Press in 2004.

 
Chuck Bazerman
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

Chuck Bazerman is a Professor Emeritus of Education. His affiliation with CITS stems from his research concerning the history of scientific writing, other forms of writing used in advancing technological projects, and the relation of writing to the development of disciplines of knowledge. He served as Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication. He is founder of the International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research. His study The Languages of Edison's Light was awarded Best Book of 1999 in History of Science and Technology.

Jim Blascovich
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

James Blascovich is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. His two major research interests are social motivation and social influence within technologically mediated environments. He uses immersive virtual environment technology to empirically investigate social influence processes within virtual environments including conformity, non-verbal communication, collaborative decision-making, and leadership.

Dorothy Chun
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emerita)

Dorothy Chun is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Education. Professor Chun studies cognitive and social process in learning with multimedia and has authored courseware for language and culture acquisition. Her work on how technology can be used to promote learning in college classrooms in a variety of subjects has been supported by a Mellon grant. 

Jon Cruz
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

Jon Cruz is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology and in the Department of Asian American Studies. Dr. Cruz's interests include culture; the sociology of knowledge; American racial history; and media.

Anna Everett
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emerita)

Anna Everett is a Professor Emerita of Film and Media Studies. Dr. Everett works in the fields of film and TV history/theory, African-American film and culture, and digital media technologies.

James Frew
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

James Frew is an Emeritus faculty member in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, formerly the principal investigator at the University’s Institute for Computational Earth System Science (ICESS), his research interests lie in the emerging field of environmental informatics, a synthesis of computer, information, and Earth sciences. 

Noah Friedkin
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emeritus)

Noah Friedkin is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology. His research has concentrated on social networks, and the processes of information and influence flows that unfold in social networks.

Judith Green
  • Faculty Research Affiliate (Emerita)

Judith Green was Professor Emerita of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Green's teaching and research focus on teaching-learning relationships, disciplinary knowledge as socially constructed, and ethnographic research and discourse studies of the patterns of everyday life in both physical and virtual classrooms.